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BIRDS.   135

 

Here then are one hundred and fourteen species. The list could be enlarged by taking in the lakes and some other features of the district, which is twenty-seven miles from the sea-coast, where, of course, numerous additions could be made of beach and ocean birds. Among so many as I have named, one comes as a matter of course to have his favorites, but all are interesting. Some of them are delightful songsters, others are almost dumb, and others, again, are harsh screamers. The swamp-robin, or hermit-thrush, is the most charming of the musical fraternity. The jays are the noisiest ; the cedar-birds the most silent. The most unsocial are the raven, the olive-sided flycatcher and his cousin, the wood pewee. The hardest fighters are kingbirds. The most ferocious is the goshawk. The most intelligent is the crow, and the least intelligent, night-hawks and spruce partridges. The most beautiful nests are made by humming-birds and wood pewees, and the worst by the cuckoos. The cow-pen bird makes no nest, but lays her eggs in the nest of other birds for them to hatch. The raven is most distinguished as a bird of bad omens. The only good thing I ever read about them is the ac-count of them taking food to the prophet Elijah. They are so eager and greedy to eat all they can


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