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THE RED SQUIRREL.   125

a long distance unhurt is a peculiar trick of the tree squirrels.

While I am amused and interested in the red squirrel, and would not like to see them exterminated, still it must be admitted that through their ravages on useful birds they are not a desirable part of our population so far as bread and butter are concerned. But the forests and road-sides would lose a very pretty feature if this nimble bright animal was taken away. He doubtless has his " inalienable " rights to live and be as happy as he can, or he would not be at all. Everything was not made for us, and for our use. We are at the head of the class, but that gives us no title to put all others below us under our feet. Our boasted superiority is, after all, only in mental and moral directions. The foxes and deer have keener sense of smell than we have, birds have better eyes, and superior means of locomotion, spiders sling their wheel nets like trained engineers, fishes return from ocean voyages to their own rivers, birds fly from the Arctic to the Torrid zones with no other guide than their own natural ability, bees and ants organize into governments ; and so one might go on to show that all the mind in this world is not in mankind. The squirrel knows his little world of trees and fences, and old stumps and


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