Previous Nature Studies in the Acadian Land (1899) Next

 

124   IN THE ACADIAN LAND.

erations. They hide in damp places because they are the most numerous and convenient localities for storage purposes.

To get back to our squirrel making his break-fast on browse. I had never noticed before how useful his tail was on a cold morning. It was drawn tight over his back to make the most of it for a blanket. To see him in frolicsome mood in the summer one would think he considered his tail a mere plaything to be flirted and whisked for fun. When he curls up in his nest his tail is made to do duty for bed-clothing. A very serious charge lies at our red squirrel's door : he is a bold bad robber of birds' nests, eating eggs or young with great relish. All our small birds are unable to drive him away, and their young become victims to his appetite. I was witness to an attempt on a robin's nest that was built on the end of a birch limb about thirty feet from the ground. The outcry of the pair of birds attracted my attention. The squirrel was within six feet of the nest, hitching along iii short jerks, while the indignant birds almost alighted on his back. At last one of them made a desperate drive at him and knocked him off the limb. He made himself as flat as .a, pancake, and although he struck on a granite boulder he scurried away at once. This ability to fall from


Previous Nature Studies in the Acadian Land (1899) Next