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THE RED SQUIRREL.   121

securely alone. In the sharp competition for food everywhere prevailing many have been the plans and devices to secure it, to keep it, to use it to the best purpose. Mankind has often stumbled by accident upon discoveries and inventions that have proved of great service, and doubtless in the animal world below him the same thing has occurred. If an animal were to hide a portion of food not then needed, it would be an act that might save his life, and, if it became a habit in his descendants, might pre-serve the species to which he belonged. As a matter of fact, many meat-eating animals do hide portions of their food not needed at that time. We have all seen or known of dogs burying meat bones for future use, and weasels and other creatures do the same. I have seen a tame crow hide portions of food, even covering them with a chip, and taking much pains to do it well. Very often he did not return for it, be-cause he had an abundance elsewhere. His act was an inherited habit, the surplus bit of food suggested and prompted the hiding it. This habit, or now called instinct, of hiding or storing food by animals may have originated accidentally. Any ravenous, hungry creature seizing his portion, or a good deal more, and running, as the hens do, to a place of safety, would

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