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BY THE RIVERSIDE.   113

A close cousin of the bayberry is keeping it company here, the "sweet fern," Myrica aspleni folium. It, too, is blessed with a healthy fragrance through all its leaves that outlasts the life of them. They seem to have been all their days gathering in, by some cunning chemistry, the pungent aroma of the wayward winds and the kindly soil. The bark, and twigs, and leaves are rich in the material serviceable for tanning purposes. It is not a showy shrub, neither is it of much service to man, but it is a pleasing feature of nature, growing in waste places, covering unsightly surfaces with restful green and gracious influences.

Here this chapter must come to a close with-out more than a glance here and there, where one might linger long with profit if he loves the life, and varied aspects in which the Maker of all has made his presence known.


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