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BY THE RIVERSIDE.

'• TUE earth is all enchanted ground. With its light and shade, its ebb and flow, it is all thine."—PARSEE SCRIPTURES.

WITHIN a mile or more of the gold mines on this road of 'many marvels there is a bridge crossing the Wildcat River. This is a brisk stream, forty or fifty feet in width at this point, but a few rods below it opens into a large pond, where the white and yellow lilies grow, where the wild (lucks feed, and the swallows skim its gleaming surface.

I have Halted here this October afternoon because many things invited me, and there was no good reason why I should not accept the invitations. There are no lovelier days in all the year than these. Julie has its peculiar charms of unrolling leaves, of white banners on the wild-pear trees, and all the promise of flower and fruit, but October is the realization of the promise. The barns are filled, the meadows are picturesque with stacks of hay peeping out of the alders and red-leaved maples,


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