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102   IN THE ACADIAN LAND.

nerves, and are sensitive to a degree that we call hardly imagine. Through that means the animal feels the presence of near objects even in dark rooms and caves, and avoids them. Probably there is a sensible difference in the air currents near any object. Many species of bats have peculiar leaf-like structures growing straight up from the end of the nose, and these are thought to be feelers.

It is well known that bats live upon flying bugs and beetles that are out for an airing at night. It is also a common saying, " Blind as a bat." Now, if a bat is blind, how does he man-age to find his food in the dusky twilight, and even in the dark ? The fact is he has very keen sight, and also very sensitive wings, to tell him if he has run against any living thing that may serve as food. I think it is not generally known how they are captured. The mouth is small ; there are no hands, no bill, nothing, apparently, to aid in capturing his prey. He, makes a net of his wings, he draws his tail well under him when about to take an insect, thus forming a bag, and the insect ,is run down and run into it, and then seized and eaten. One may readily observe them do this ; they halt in a hurried, scuffing way and then go on for more. When one considers that they have no nests to


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