Previous Nature Studies in the Acadian Land (1899) Next

 

100   IN THE ACADIAN LAND.

and prove very destructive to plantations. There are about four hundred species known to science. They are to be found in all climates, even where it is much colder than in Nova Scotia. During the cold season, of fully six months, they congregate in caves, hanging to the roof in great bunches, where they have been found in midwinter white with frost but unfrozen and alive. With us they pass the winter in old buildings where they can hide under the finish, also in hollow trees, and holes among rocks, etc. It is truly wonderful that they are not frozen in such localities, where the temperature must be often many degrees below freezing. Old Nature knows the way, and these curious animals, slung in their wings, sleep on during half a year, without fuel or nourishment, and awake to renew the perils and pleasures of an existence that would hardly seem worth the having.

It will be worth the study to examine the wing structure of a bat. The wings of a bird are constructed on the two fore limbs. They are arms and wrists and fingers with quills and feathers on them. Until the wrist is reached the bones are very much like our own, the fingers are soldered together, and on them are supported the long quills. From the wrist to


Previous Nature Studies in the Acadian Land (1899) Next