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84   IN THE ACADIAN LAND.

the air that caresses them. While we admire him he launches away as if the atmosphere were his native element, and he loved the breeze and the sunshine. He left behind him, still clinging to its anchorage, the old husk with its glassy eyes reduced to transparent shards, its clutching gear folded at its breast in meek mockery, its claws deep sunk in their last grip. The past is past with this dragon forever ; there will be no revisiting of his old haunts where he prowled for prey with his grappling tongs; he said no " good-bye " to his useless shroud clinging there in mimicry of life : "Let the dead bury their (lead."

Thus Nature teaches us or may teach us all possible things are easily possible, and it is scarce harder to believe that even human creatures will in some way, no more wonderful, enter upon a new life for which this is a mere larval or preparatory stage. The book of Nature is writ in eloquent language, and illustrated by endless designs, and the more's the pity that " the world is so much with us getting and spending " that we do not have eyes nor ears for her lessons and her delights.


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