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32   IN THE ACADIAN LAND.

young through their feeblest stage. This species of yellow perch will, with good food and plenty of it, grow to much larger size than we see them. But now we will let him go and I will move over to the pole dam, a rod or two distant, where there is an inviting-looking puddle, cool and clear in the shadow.

It does not take a long search of an experienced eye to discover the tyrant of this miniature pond. It is not a fish nor a reptile, but an insect " scarce half made up." It is the " devil's darning-needle," or dragon-fly, one of the Libellulicdce in an undeveloped stage. So far as outward appearances are concerned, there is no hint of his future destiny, when he will course the air in burnished armor, and " down the listed sunbeam ride resplendant with steel-blue mail and shield!" We may readily see him, and study him only a few days, or even hours, it may be, before the great change overtakes him. It is a creature of about one inch in length, with two stubs of what are really wing-cases on his fore back ; the hinder portion of his body is grub-like, covered with a shell. There are six stout legs. The head is large, the eyes bulging, and jaws stout. We will watch him closely now and see him use a " concealed weapon " that he carries neatly tucked up


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