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80   IN THE ACADIAN LAND.

This whirligig calls up another member of the family that has taken to the water. It would not require much dredging up of mire mud from the brook-bed above in the meadow to secure a specimen. He is dark brown, almost black, about three-quarters of an inch long, very round on the back, and rather thin. His legs are adapted to swimming. This is the big water beetle, Dysticus marginalis. He lives mostly under water, but he must breathe, so he comes to the surface, like a porpoise, once in a while, to get a breath, but one scarcely notices this act, as he makes but little show of himself. He is an insect shark, even attacking small fish. They fly from one locality to another, even miles away. The males have suckers on their fore legs very much like those on squid and devil-fish ; these are to better enable them to hold their victims while eating them.

While I have been observing these " whirligigs " another fellow-mortal, who would not mind swallowing them all in a gulp or two, has been furtively showing himself from time to time from under the foam-flecked shadow of the bridge. He is about seven inches in length, clad in burnished scales from head to tail. His sides glisten like polished bronze, and his red fins winnow the water as he rests above the yel-


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