Previous Nature Studies in the Acadian Land (1899) Next

 

78   IN THE ACADIAN LAND.

hunting-grounds. Much food would tempt them into the water, and then those best adapted to swim would be, through many generations, naturally preserved, and the water became their home. The eyes, although two on a side, are but one eye partitioned for two purposes. Now if we take a pin and use it carefully we can lift up the hard shining back in two plates that cover a pair of delicate and sickly wings. They are what is left of the stronger ones of its distant ancestors. They have suffered for lack of use. I have never observed one in flight, but one may see them occasionally jump in the air a few inches when alarmed from below, and then the wings are used. They are good divers. The eggs are placed end-to-end on leaves of water plants. The young are white or whitish grubs ; these when full-grown make coccoons, or web nests, on the under sides of leaves or twigs near the water, and when their time has expired they find their way out and drop into the water. One may ask, of what use it is to know this story about a little beetle. True there is no money in it, but there is what is better than money, there is knowledge of a high order. The same power that designed and sustains these little creatures, also designed and sustains the universe. Man is " fearfully and wonderfully made, " and this little insect is


Previous Nature Studies in the Acadian Land (1899) Next