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68   IN THE ACADIAN LAND.

in the Swiss Alps and other mountains. We know his tracks ; we can see what he does; and we find the same tracks abundant here on these " Molega Barrens " and all over northern North America.

I would not tell this story about the glacier only that it explains the prospector's mode of operation. In looking for a gold-bearing vein we seek for fragments of quartz on the surface, among the bushes and bracken, and when found they are broken and examined. These pieces of quartz are known as " float " or "drift," and when a promising bit is found the prospector looks northward for more ; if he finds other portions of the vein he continues northward until no more are to be found on top of ground; then he begins to dig a trench, still going north-ward, and, if he succeeds, the vein will be found anywhere from twenty-five to several hundred feet from where the last " float" was obtained on the surface. The reason why the prospector goes northward is because experience has taught him that the fragments of the vein are always south of it. Here science steps in and explains that the glacier was the cause that broke the vein and carried its fragment in its course, and was aided by the rushing floods that moved seaward too, when the Glacial Period


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