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66   IN THE ACADIAN LAND.

fled or interbedded veins. If all were clear as we suppose, other veins in plenty would be seen running in various directions and entering the rocks at differing angles. These are known as " angulars "- or " crossleads." In both kinds of leads or veins they are formed of white quartz or silica.

In conditions like we have here imagined, where nothing would hide the solid surface of rocks, there would be no great difficulty for the " first comers " to locate a gold mine that would be a fortune in itself. It would only be necessary to examine these white lines of outcrop-ping quartz veins, where gold would be found in some of them, and then select the richest veins. As matters now stand, the once bare rocks and veins are covered throughout the district, with few exceptions, with an average depth of seven or eight feet of gravel, sand and clay. In places this superficial deposit is fifty feet deep. Of course all this upper material is made up of other rocks broken into different degrees of fineness. The underlying " bed rock " or " country rock " belongs to the Silurian group, and therefore to be reckoned among the earliest of water-made or sedimentary formations ; but this overlying material, in which all the vegetable life is rooted, is corn-


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