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SPIDERS.   57

 

She not only taketh hold with her hands in king's palaces but she festoons the dingy attic and cellars with silken nets. She covers the fields, and pastures, and shrubs, and orchards, and fences, with dainty traps, which are tended and repaired and watched with hungry eyes for victims.

I have been induced to write this chapter on account of the interesting features that come within its scope, but perhaps it would not have been written but for the fact that a recent early morning ride to the mine gave inc a capital opportunity to see spiders' webs everywhere decked in glittering gems of dew, that served to make them not only visible but beautiful in the level sunbeams. They were stretched across the road in sagging curves, threaded closely with beads that unbraided the white light of the sunbeam, and revealed its hidden rainbow of colors. From naked branches and fragrant fir limbs they hung in dainty wheels, woven in spokes and spirals, and braced with skill and judgment. They carpeted the unsightly brush-piles in gleaming gossamer. Under the magic of dew and sunshine the works of these marvellous spinners and weavers stood revealed. Many species had taken part in the performance. Each one had its own way of constructing a trap. All this decking the


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