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WEASELS.

"SAUCY and as quarrelsome as a weasel." —SHAKESPEARE.

WEASELS do not appear to be common

WEASELS with us, or in fact anywhere. This winter morning I saw one dodging in and out a pile of snow-covered brush. All his upper parts were nearly as white as the snow, his thighs and under portions a sulphury-yellowish, the tip of his tail jet-black. This is the ermine weasel, Putorius ernninea. We are credited by writers with another species, Putorius vulgaris, about the same size, with a shorter tail, no sulphur-yellowish, no black on the tip of the tail. If we have this latter species it must be much rarer than the former, which I will proceed to discuss. This white dress is the weasel's winter coat, as most people know, but it is not generally observed that his under parts are always white or yellowish-white. In the warm season he is a mahogany brown on the back and sides. This change of color is worth consideration. There can be no question but the change is a decided


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