Previous Nature Studies in the Acadian Land (1899) Next

 

HARES.   41

 

But we will return to Molega Road and its attractions. In the winter twilight one may see them quietly browsing, or bounding here and .Lere as noiseless as ghosts. They have a habit of taking a course through the bushes where there is the least obstruction of limbs, and thus beat out paths through the moss, and in the winter through the snow. They prefer to run in these paths, and turn out here and there to feed. Boys are aware of their habits, and easily snare them by placing a small pole across the path and tying a wire snare to it, and sticking some brush cunningly on each side of the snare to hold it steady, and bar up all other ways but the one through the snare. Now Bunny could jump over the pole with the greatest ease, but he will not ; he stops, lays his ears well back, and carefully puts his head into the snare as if he were bent on committing suicide. In a moment the fatal noose is tightened about his neck, he jumps here and there in the most frantic fashion, and ends by strangling. The owner of the snare finds him in the morning, a few feet from the path, all " drawn up " and frozen, even to his eyes. Sometimes the snare is tied to a bent sapling, and the rabbit in his struggle sets it free, only to find himself dangling in mid-air. Either his meat, or his fur, or both, is the


Previous Nature Studies in the Acadian Land (1899) Next