Previous Nature Studies in the Acadian Land (1899) Next

 

A BUTTERFLY.

" So much to learn ! Old Nature's ways Of glee and gloom with rapt amaze,

To study, probe and paint — brown earth, Salt seas, blue heavens, the tilth and dearth, Birds, grasses, trees, the natural things That throb or grope, or poise on wings."

THE largest of our butterflies are out in great force to-clay. I refer to yellow and black species, Mostly yellow. The name in books, by which students know them all over the world, is Puhilio turnus. On the edges of the muddy puddles in the road many of them are settled down for something to drink. Not one person out of a dozen knows how they do that. If you take one of them in your hands aid examine his head you will find under his chin a threadlike, close coil. If you take a pin or a needle and pull it out the length will be found to be about one inch. This instrument is hollow ; it is used principally for sucking honey from blossoms. But there is no accounting for taste ; and here are these beautiful creatures so delighted and intoxicated with the washings)


Previous Nature Studies in the Acadian Land (1899) Next