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12   IN THE ACADIAN LAND.

forms of vegetation, wherein there was no blossom, and therefore no fruit. The first trees were giant club-mosses and ferns ; their trunks are imbedded in coal mines, and they have be-come coal. Trees that bear fruit came late in the world's history. They are products of evolutionary action, whereby creation proceeds to higher and more complex forms. Our trees all have pedigrees that run back into the lowest and earliest vegetable life. They have been a weary while in the making, as we reckon time. They have all been elected by processes that operated without sentiment, and permitted only the fittest to survive. They have all come forth out of great tribulation, and every outward feature and every inward disposition and tendency of each species is either a scar of conflict, a plan for propagation, a vestige of ancestry, or a taint of on-coming dissolution. The dimensions when full-grown, the nature of the grain, the peculiarities of the bark, the shape of the leaves, the contour of the foliage, are all what they are be-cause of the experiences of the species and its ancestries. To deny this statement would be to ignore the plainest truths. If any reader feels that the Creator is not recognized in this way then let him consider how a tree is not called into existence to-day, but grows slowly from a


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