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8   IN THE ACADIAN LAND.

It depends upon what taste and love of nature that one brings to the landscape or the woods, whether he will discover beauty therein. If the woods are only to be looked upon as an assemblage of trees serviceable for saw-logs, ship-timber, cordwood, harrow-crotches and sled-runners, then this is the view of the browsing moose. He knows the locality as a feeding-ground and shelter. We do not blame him for not looking deeper, because his natural capacity goes no farther. But man has finer endowments, that, if rightly cultivated and properly used, enable him to appreciate the beauty and diversity and infinite resources of nature. Even the great works of men's minds and hands are worthy of study and admiration. How much more worthy are the products of the master mind that brings forth suns in galaxies, and finds room in the commonest toadstool to exercise a skill and power that passes our comprehension. It is the proper part of education, at home and in the school, to draw out these higher qualities of the mind, that show themselves in the eager curiosity and enthusiasm of childhood and youth. Alas, that our methods are so well calculated to suppress the opening buds of higher promise ! Alas that the " life star " that was born with us " fades into the light of common day " and the


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