Previous Index Next

 

NATURAL HISTORY, TORONTO REGION

 

inhabiting sandy fields and open sandy woods High Park is still a good locality, and many other arenaceous forms, particularly among the beetles, may be taken on Toronto Island. Aquatic species may be collected in Grenadier Pond (High Park), the Humber River, Etobicoke Creek, the upper part of the Don and in the lagoons of Toronto Island. Large quantities of material of many species, especially beetles, are sometimes cast up on the beach drift of the Island.

For a city of its size comparatively little collecting has been done about Toronto, and some of the smaller orders have been wholly neglected. The largest general collection is that of the late Dr. Wm. Brodie, now in the Provincial Museum. The list of Hymenoptera is for the most part merely a list of the named species in this collection. It is believed that they were authentically determined, as Dr. Brodie was in the habit of sending his specimens to Ashmead and other specialists at Washington for determination. This is certainly the case in regard to the Chalcidoidea. The list of Cynipoidea and the gall-forming Tenthredinidae were for the most part furnished by Dr. A. Cosens. For the list of Coleoptera I am indebted to Mr. R. J. Crew, who has collected beetles extensively about Toronto. His specimens were determined by Prof. Wickham. The Lepidoptera have been kindly listed by Mr. A. Gibson, of Ottawa, his list being mainly based on his own collections. The Diptera have not been

296


Previous Index Next