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NATURAL HISTORY, TORONTO REGION

 

micas oreades) may in their season be easily gathered. It is, indeed, surprising that this last species is not better known and more used. It is excellent and can be readily dried so as to be kept for winter use. A wide-awake mycophagist may also in our streets and parks find casual dishes of Coprinus micaceus, Hypholoma incertum, or Hypholoma appendiculatum, Collybia velutipes and some puffballs by seizing the right moment, before the lawn mower or the destroying foot of the small boy or the too rapid natural process of decay has removed them. So also consider-able patches of the Inky Coprinus (Coprinus atramentarius) when once discovered may furnish a succession of crops.

Besides the above, however, not many species offer any very reliable supplies. It may almost be said that they are only made use of by those who are interested in them as a subject of study. By the curious, in good woods in summer, almost daily sup-plies may, in places frequented by summer holiday-makers, be obtained of certain woods-loving species, e.g., Clitocybe infundibuliformis, Collybia radicata, Collybia platyphylla, Pleurotus ostreatus and sapidus, Cantharellus cibarius and several Hydnums, Russulas and Boleti ; but there would not seem to be any considerable use made anywhere in this country of wild-growing fungi. We may except perhaps the morels and large puffballs, such as Calvatia gigantea, and, of course, the common Field Mushroom (Agaricus campester) ; many country dwellers do know and

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