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CHAPTER VI.

 

THE SEED PLANTS OF TORONTO
AND VICINITY.

By
PRINCIPAL WILLIAM SCOTT.

TORONTO has a great variety of soil and surface. The soil varies from the purest of sand to the heaviest of clay. The Island, which faces the city, is composed of almost pure sand; the valleys of the Don and the Humber are almost pure clay. In the immediate vicinity of the city are to be found cold bogs and swamps.

The elevation of the land above the sea level varies from 250 feet at the lake front to 577 feet at the Forest Hill station on the Belt Line railway, and 817 feet at Richmond Hill. These conditions combine to produce a great variety of flowering plants. I t is needless to say that man and the domestic animals have destroyed many plants that at one time were abundant here. Many rare and beautiful species that formerly flourished on the Island are, if not entirely extinct, rarely to be met with. " Ladies' tresses " could always be found in abundance. The exact locality where they were, so common is now several feet under the sand which was pumped over the land to raise it. The only locality in which

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