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THE CLIMATE OF TORONTO

 

records, and shortly after this, in the spring of 1907, the instruments were removed to a somewhat con-fined area half a mile distant, where they remained for eighteen months, until removed to the present Observatory in September, 1909. During two years prior to removal from the old site, comparisons were made with thermometers placed at the site now occupied, and very close agreement was found. In addition to this long series of observations at the Government Observatory, there was an almost unbroken series of observations by the Rev. Charles Dade, between 1830 and 1839.

The Toronto Observatory, in addition to being the local meteorological observing station, is the central office of the Dominion Meteorological Service, whence are issued all weather forecasts and storm warnings and also all Government bulletins and reports, concerning the climatology of Canada.

The mean annual temperature, as determined from readings of the maximum and minimum thermometers during 71 years' observations, is 44°.4. The highest annual mean was 47°.2 in 1898, and the lowest was 40°.8 in 1895—a difference of 6°.4. The greatest difference between any two successive years was 3°.8 in 1882-3, and the least was 00, in 1841-2.

The seasonal mean temperatures are : Winter, 23°.4; Spring, 41°.0; Summer, 650.8 ; Autumn, 47°.5.

There are some indications that the climate has changed slightly with the gradual clearing away of 83

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