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CHAPTER III.

 

GEOLOGY OF THE TORONTO
REGION.

By
A. P. COLEMAN, Ph.D., F.R.S.

INTRODUCTION.

TORONTO, which lies on the north shore of Lake Ontario near its western end, is a convenient centre from which excursions may be made by land or water to various points of geological interest in the region of the Great Lakes. Railroads radiate east, west and north, and steamers ply to the east, west and south, giving easy access to lake ports, especially Niagara. Toronto itself and its suburbs include some of the most important Pleistocene sections in North America, and within a radius of one hundred miles the main geological formations from the Archaean to the Devonian may be studied. Though the region has undergone no faulting or folding since the Archaean it has experienced important elevations and depressions and has preserved the record of a very complex and extraordinary series of events in the latest geological periods, including the action of ice sheets, of great lakes of different ages and levels, and of important rivers and waterfalls.

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