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NATURAL HISTORY, TORONTO REGION

 

reported as having villages or settlements at Missisauga River, Manitoulin Island, Kente, Toronto River, Matcitaen, and the west end of Lake Ontario, besides at Lake St. Clair (and Detroit). In 1746 the Mississagas were admitted as the " seventh tribe " into the Iroquois League, having sided with the latter people against the French—the MS. in the Toronto Public Library (date c. 1801) still classes the " Mississagui," or " tribu de 1'aigle," as an Iroquois tribe (i.e., " tribu des sauvages hurons "). For a time, some of the Mississagas even lived within the borders of what is now the State of New York. Their eastward progress in Ontario was barred by the Ottawas and the French, they had a conflict with the latter near Cataraqui in 1705 ; and Charlevoix (1720) describes a " fire-dance " executed by the Mississagas of that region some years later. They figure prominently in the New York Colonial Documents of the eighteenth century. The descendants of these Mississagas, who migrated from the region north of Lake Huron, are to be found in the Mississaga Indians, numbering between eight hundred and nine hundred, who live to-day at Rice Lake and Alnwick, Mud (Chemung) Lake, Scugog Island (Lake Scugog), and in the settlement of the New Credit (Brantford). Some dwelt formerly on Grape Island, etc., in the Bay of Quinte.

The Indians at the New Credit are the most progressive of all the Mississagas, and they are the ones who formerly lived on the River Credit (given

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