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INDIANS WHO INHABITED TORONTO

 

Island, in Lake Huron. Appearing, with a certain kind of normality, as Messissaga, Mississaga, Mississauga, or 111ississagua, this word is spelt in the old records in more than a score of different fashions, running all the way from Messagues to Michesaking and Missinasagues. The Mississagas are the same people termed in some of the early French documents Cheveux leves (or Cheveux releves), Nation du Bois, etc. Among the names given them by the various tribes of the Iroquoian stock were the following: Assisagigrone, Awighsaghroone, Achsisaghek, Nuakahn (Tuscarora name), Tisagechroone, etc. The word Missisaga, more correctly Missisagi, is derived from Missisaking, which in the language of these people, whose dialect is practically Ojibwa (or Chippewa), or very close to it, signifies " at the place of many river-mouths " (missi, saking), an appellation belonging properly to the River Mississauga, in the District of Algoma, the home of these Indians, when first heard of, in the early years of the seventeenth century—they are then described as " living around the mouth of the River Mississague," where the French met them in 1634. After the destruction of the Huron settlements by the Iroquois, the Mississagas began, early in the next century, to migrate into that part of what is now the Province of Ontario, lying between Lakes Huron, Erie and Ontario, and, about 1720, the French established a post for trading with them at the western end of Lake Ontario. Some fifteen years later, they are

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