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CHAPTER II.

 

THE INDIANS WHO FORMERLY
INHABITED OR VISITED THE
SITE OF TORONTO.

By

ALEXANDER FRANCIS CHAMBERLAIN,
M.A., Ph.D.,

Professor of Anthropology. Clark University. Worcester. Mass.,
Sometime Fellow in Modern Languages. University College. Toronto.

THE region which is now occupied by the capital of the Province of Ontario was familiar to two of the great Indian peoples of northeastern North America. The city's name, Toronto, although its exact derivation has not yet been satisfactorily deter-mined, comes from one of the dialects of the Iroquoian stock ; and the natives who inhabited the western end of Lake Ontario, at the close of the eighteenth century, were the Algonkian Mississagas, or Mississaugas, whose tribal appellation still survives in Mississauga Avenue, in what was formerly the village of Parkdale, now a part of the city itself. The name is likewise preserved in Old Fort Mississauga, at the mouth of the Niagara River; Mississauga River, in the District of Algoma; and Mississauga Strait, between Manitoulin and Cockburn

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