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NATURAL HISTORY, TORONTO REGION

 

that of the University of London. The University thus became merely an examining body. The teaching of the Arts faculty was handed over to a new foundation known as " University College," which became " the vital centre of the University."* For this new college the beautiful Norman-Gothic building was constructed which is still its pride and its home. On St. Valentine's Day in 1890 a fire destroyed the eastern half of the stately pile, which contained the Library and the Convocation Hall. As in the case of the rare Arabian bird, this loss, apparently irreparable at the time, proved ultimately a gain, and the opening of a new era of expansion in the history of the University. Toronto for once sympathized, Quebec sent ten thousand dollars, and the Ontario Legislature passed an Act the next day providing for the restoration of the building in a manner more suitable to the enlarged classes which had begun to crowd its halls. The generosity of individual citizens supplied funds for a new library, to which came contributions in books from all parts of the world. Germany alone sent seven thousand volumes. The building is on the east side of the lawn. To the south-west rises the new Convocation Hall, due in part to the gifts of the alumni. The inner hall has admirable acoustic properties, and contains an organ, made by Casavant, of Quebec, in perfect keeping with its surroundings. Other University buildings around the lawn are the Medical, with its Palladian

* Chancellor Burwash, " The University of Toronto and its Colleges," p. 39.

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