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NATURAL HISTORY, TORONTO REGION

 

lington, and the new up-town York Club, on the corner of Bloor and St. George, are recognized as pre-eminent. The Albany, the Reform and the National have political leanings, although the last has lost much of its original significance. The Canadian and Empire are luncheon clubs, meeting weekly and listening to addresses from distinguished men, usually strangers, on topics of the hour. They indicate the growing intellectual interests of the community and the rising tide of Canadian sentiment. The most interesting historically of these luncheon clubs is the U. E. L. Association, the descendants of the United Empire Loyalists, who meet annually to celebrate the coming of their ancestors to Canada. Scientific subjects are dealt with by the Royal Astronomical Society, the Folklore Society, the Canadian Historical Society, and the Canadian Institute. The Institute has a home of its own on College Street, south of the University Chemistry building, with a good scientific reading-room and the best collection of Transactions of learned societies in Canada. It was founded as an engineering and scientific club in the year 1851, and its own publications illustrate in a very interesting manner the changes and developments in the methods of research during the last two generations.

But though often called the city of colleges, the interests of Toronto are essentially commercial and manufacturing. Even here, however, the printing and publishing trade holds a record. Toronto is said to be the fifth city on the continent in this line, being surpassed only by New York, Boston, Chicago and

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