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NATURAL HISTORY, TORONTO REGION

 

ways run north from the main plank walk towards the inner lagoon, giving charming glimpses of a truly Venetian combination of canals and streets. One of these cross roads leads to Centre Island Park, famed for family picnics and amateur baseball matches. East of this, on the northern or harbour shore of the Island, are the grounds and clubhouse of the Royal Canadian Yacht Club, the scene of many delightful social functions.

Toronto first became celebrated as the home of the world's champion rower, E. J. Hanlan, and its supremacy in aquatic sports has been well maintained. O'Connor and Lou Seholes were also world champions, the latter winning the Diamond Sculls at Henley in 1904. His brother John had previously won the amateur light-weight boxing championship of England and America, a combination of honours not likely to be repeated in one family. Goulding, the champion walker of the world, and G. S. Lyon, the champion amateur golfer of America at the St. Louis Exhibition, are also Torontonians. Athletics are extremely popular. Thousands take part in both summer and winter sports, for which the climate usually gives ample opportunity. Although lacrosse is the national game, hockey is the favourite in winter and baseball in summer. The cool and beautiful location of the ball grounds at Hanlan's Point helps to swell the attendance, which sometimes reaches twenty thousand. Toronto has seldom experienced more dramatic moments than when the Upper

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