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TORONTO: AN HISTORICAL SKETCH

 

It was a professor of mathematics who led the way, and certainly there is no better place to study hydro-dynamics in its relation to geography. At the south-ern extremity of this row of cottages stands the Lake-side Summer Home for Sick Children, the gift of Mr. John Ross Robertson, who also built the Hospital for Sick Children on College Street, the most appealing of Toronto's many charitable institutions. Few sights are so touching as the annual moving in May of the little patients and their nurses from the city to the Lakeside Home. Turning to the left, we pass the lighthouse which for years has guarded this point and is the one building that knew the Island as a peninsula. For it was not till 1853 that the Eastern Gap, now the ordinary entrance for vessels from the south and .east, was broken through in a violent storm. Beyond the lighthouse are the pumping station and filtering basin of the water-works, and in the offing we see the bell-buoy which marks the end of the intake pipe and whose mournful note suggests recollections of water famines and disinfected microbes, now happily matters of ancient history. A pretty little church hard by is used by different denominations in turn, recalling the fact that Church Union has made more progress in Canada than elsewhere and that there is a good prospect of the Congregational, Methodist and Presbyterian Churches uniting within the coming decade. On May 22, 1913, an Anglican Church Unity Society was organized in Toronto. As we go east little road-

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