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NATURAL HISTORY, TORONTO REGION

 

During the first decade of the new century Toronto's progress has been phenomenal. It has also been all-embracing. Millionaire manufacturers, successful merchants, retired farmers, half-pay officers, English gentlemen, Italian navvies, Polish push-cart vendors, Greek bootblacks, and such a polyglot horde from the Balkans that three thousand are said to have left for the seat of war last year—all these and many more have come to spend or gain a fortune in Toronto. After having been for a generation a miniature Bel-fast, with a tincture of Edinburgh and a tinge of Glasgow, Toronto bids fair to become a Canadian Chicago with an unassimilated foreign element that is both a burden and an incentive to the charitable organizations of the city.

Nowhere is this change so apparent as in the district known for half a century as the " ward," and bounded by Queen, Yonge, College, and the Avenue. In the early days of Queen Victoria's reign the late Chief Justice Macaulay used to walk across the fields from his residence near the present site of the Bishop Strachan School to the Court in Osgoode Hall. Fifty years ago it was quite built up and peopled almost entirely by North of Ireland immigrants, mostly members of the Orange order, and well represented in the City Council by the late Mayor Warring Kennedy and on the School Board by Mr. Frank Somers. At the present time the " ward " still retains at its diagonally opposite angles, N.E. and S.W., the relics of the munificence of the earliest landowners in the

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