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NATURAL HISTORY, TORONTO REGION

 

couraged immigration. The war had raised the value of all agricultural products, and the price of land on Yonge Street advanced to figures that would seem small now but were thought extravagant by the prudent of that day. The gold fever in Australia and British Columbia had fired the imagination and helped to bring about this era of speculation. It was not long before the Civil War in the United States once more gave an impulse to trade in Canada, soon lessened, however, by the abrogation of the Reciprocity Treaty. During the war a number of Southerners took up their abode here, making their rendezvous in the Caer Howell Hotel on the Queen's Avenue. The excellent schools and colleges had already begun to attract students from both North and South.

The provincial school system had been modelled after those of Ireland and of Prussia by the Superintendent of Education, Dr. Ryerson. Upper Canada College, the Eton of Canada, had been brought to a high state of efficiency under Principal George R. R. Cockburn. The University, founded as King's College in 1842, had been freed from the control of the Church of England in 1850, and was in other ways keeping pace with the spirit of the age. Bishop Strachan, who had been President of the University, although now over seventy, had collected the endowment of a new Anglican institution, Trinity College. The Presbyterians had also their theological school, Knox College, which after many moves and more than a half-century in affiliation with the Uni-

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