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NATURAL HISTORY, TORONTO REGION

 

minds of our town-planners as the meandering ways of Rosedale.

We cannot blame the first builders of the city for neglecting the aesthetic. Ample provision was made for the parks and squares of the future city. The original Parliament Buildings were constructed on the shore to the south-east of the little capital, and the road along the shore to the Old Fort at the western entrance to the harbour, while as straight as Appius or Agrippa could have desired, was bordered by groves of oak, and in the early prints suggests a scene of sylvan beauty. By some the name Toronto is said to mean " oaks by the water." If so it ceased to be appropriate with the coming of the railways in the " fifties."

Long before that date York had received its baptism of fire and blood. The war of 1812 was due in great part to the bad feeling that had remained in the South and West, particularly Kentucky, since the Indian wars. This feeling was intensified by the massacre of Frenchtown, or Raisin River, in January, 1813, when several hundred Kentuckian prisoners were killed by the Indian allies of General Proctor. In the following April a large force, under General Pike, of New Jersey, attacked York, which then contained about five hundred inhabitants and a somewhat larger garrison. In the defence of the fort a terrible accident occurred which has been described as follows by an eyewitness : " A gun was aimed at one of the vessels, and the officers, desirous

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