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TORONTO: AN HISTORICAL SKETCH

 

vance of the English, he writes to the minister de Seignelay : " M. de la Durantaye is collecting people to entrench himself at Michilimaquina and to occupy the other pass which the English may take by Toronto, the other entrance to Lake Huron. In this way our Englishmen will have somebody to speak to. All this cannot be accomplished without considerable expense, but still we must maintain our honour and our prosperity." By the middle of the next century (A.D. 1749) a stockade was erected and a trading post established at Toronto. This measure was in-tended to cut off the Indian trade from the English post which had been established at Oswego, or Choueguen, as it was then called. The new French fort was named Fort Rouille, after the Colonial minister, and was visited soon after its foundation by the famous " apostle of the Iroquois," the Abbe Picquet. He found the bread and wine good, an opinion which subsequent French visitors have not always shared, but doubted the wisdom of establishing a rival to the trading posts at Forts Frontenac and Niagara. The 1756 destruction of Oswego at the beginning of the Seven Years' War seems to have led to the abandoning of the new trading post, although the name continues to appear occasionally in dispatches. " The Journals of Major Robert Rogers," which were published in London, A.D. 1765, give an account of the visit he paid to Toronto in September, 1760, in the course of an expedition to take possession of Detroit. After describing the joyful reception and the impor-

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