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MEN OF CANADA.   79

CHARLES H.WATEROUS, senior

partner of the Waterous Engine

\Yorks Company, Brantford,

was born at Burlington, Vermont, on 29th September, 1814, of English and Puritan parentage. His father was then principal of the academy, but two years afterwards went to St. Louis, where he shortly afterwards died of malarial fever, leaving his wife and son with but little means. Arrived at the age of seven, his mother married Deacon Tripp of New Haven, Vt., with whom he lived seven years, working on the farm in summer and attending district school in winter. At fourteen his

mother died leaving him

alone in the world. He was then apprenticed at blacksmithing with Thomas Davenport, of Brandon, Vt. On his giving up business, Charles finished his trade in a machine shop and then assisted Mr. Davenport in constructing an electric motor. In 1834 he went to Ohio, working in Norwalk, Sandusky & Cleveland, and then sailing on the lakes. In 1838 he was chief engineer of the steamer " Governor Marcy," employed by the United States government to patrol the Straits. In 1838 and '39 he went to New York, to assist Mr. Davenport on a magnetic motor. In 1839, having spent all his money, he re-turned to Sandusky, Ohio, and began business on his own account. In December of that year, he married Miss Martha June, with whom he lived happily forty years. He then engaged, with Mr. J.Edgerton, in building mills

of different kinds, until 1845, when they lost their all by fire. Mr. Waterous then removed to Buff alo, in partnership with John D. Shepard. In the fall of 1848 he came to Brantford to take charge of Mr. P. C. Van Brocklin's foundry and machine shops. In 1855 he bought out Mr. Van Brocklin's interest and continued it under his own management until 1877, when it became the Waterous Engine Works Company. He and his sons are now sole owners of the establishment. The business has assumed gigantic proportions, and the Waterous engines and saw mills are found in every part of the new world.

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