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HISTORY OF CANADA.   321

the province, which are still under the control of the Dominion parliament. Special provision was made, too, to satisfy the claims of the half-breeds, a large amount of land (1,400,000 acres) being reserved for them. The provincial government was to consist of a lieutenant-governor, legislative council, and an assembly of twenty-four members. In 1875 the legislative council was abolished ; and Manitoba has now (1897) a single chamber of forty members. The Manitoba Act was formally accepted by the "pro-visional government" of Reel River on the 23rd of June, 1870, and on the same day an Imperial order-in-council was issued, which provided that Rupert's Land and the North-West Territory—including, of course, Manitoba should, from and after July 15th, 1870, form part of the Dominion of Canada.

The Red River Expedition.—The Hon. Adams G. Archibald was appointed first lieutenant-governor of the province, and

in order to ensure a peaceful inauguration of the new government, it was decided that the military expedition to Red River should be proceeded with. Accordingly, in the summer of 1870, a force of about fourteen hundred (of whom less than four hundred were British regulars) under the command of Colonel Wolseley—afterwards Sir Garnet Wolseley, connmander-inchief of the British army —proceeded to the mouth of the Kam-

inistiquia River on Lake Superior. Thence, by a long and fatiguing journey, partly by canoe and partly

on foot, the soldiers proceeded over the height of land to the shores of Lake Winnipeg. Ascending the Red River, they reached Fort Garry toward the end of August. No amnesty had been proclaimed, and for a time threats had been made that resistance would be offered to the advancing troops by the French half-breeds. No steps, however, were taken to carry out these threats, and upon \V'olseley's approach, Riel, Lepine and O'Donohue fled to the United States.

22

OLSELEY.

SIR GARNET

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