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320   HISTORY OF CANADA.

man named Thomas Scott, against whom, it is said, Riel had a personal grudge. Scott was charged with striking his guard, tried by court-martial on the 3rd of March, and sentenced to be shot the next day. In spite of every effort by D. A. Smith and by the Rev. George Young, Methodist minister at Fort Garry, to shake Riel's cruel purpose, the sentence was carried out. In Canada the news of this cold-blooded murder created intense indignation, and preparations for a military expedition to Red River were pushed rapidly forward.

Bishop Tach6 Restores Quiet.—During all these troubles the Roman Catholic Bishop of St. Boniface (Bishop Tache) had unfortunately been absent from his diocese attending a Vatican Council at Rome. He had been requested to hasten his return, and a few days after the murder of Scott he reached Fort Garry. He had received an assurance from the Canadian government that the propositions embodied in the last " Bill of Rights " were in the main satisfactory, and that the delegates from the convention would be duly received at Ottawa. He understood further that a full amnesty would be granted to Riel and his followers. Without taking into consideration the altered circumstances arising out of the Scott murder, he promised immunity to all if the union with Canada were peacefully carried out. The result was that matters at once quieted down, the prisoners were released, the delegates departed for Ottawa, and the New Nation became particularly loyal.

The Manitoba Act, 1870.—There was a strong feeling in Canada—particularly in Ontario—against receiving the delegates. It was called "treating with rebels and murderers." Upon their arrival, indeed, two of the delegates, Father Richot and A. H. Scott, were arrested upon a charge of complicity in the murder of Thomas Scott, but they were discharged, no evidence being forth-coming to connect them in any way with that outrage. The result of the deliberations following upon their mission was the Manitoba Act of 1870. By this Act the Red River and Portage la Prairie settlements, with the surrounding region, were erected into the province of Manitoba, to which the provisions of the British North America Act were to apply "as if the province of Manitoba had been one of the provinces originally united by the said Act." An exception, however, was made in reference to the public lands of


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