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HISTORY OF CANADA.   319

General Thibault, Colonel de Salaberry and Donald A. Smith—afterwards Sir Donald Smith—were sent from Canada to inquire into the grievances of the colony, and to assure the inhabitants of the good intentions of the Canadian government. Riel had always been anxious to secure the co-operation of the English-speaking settlers, and in the hope of turning the agitation into a more peaceful channel Donald A. Smith supported the proposal to call another convention. This convention met on the 25th of January and continued in session until the 10th of February. Another "Bill of Rights" was agreed upon, and delegates were appointed to proceed to Ottawa to lay the claims of the colony before the Canadian government. The somewhat strange course was taken, with the assent of Governor MacTavish, of forming a new " provisional government " of ten members, five French and live English, who were to be assisted by an elective council of twenty-four members. Of this "provisional government " Riel was chosen president.

The " Kildonan Rising. "—Dr. Schultz had already made his escape from Fort Garry, and it was now expected that the other prisoners would be released. As this .was not done a number of men from Portage la Prairie marched over to Kildonan parish to join Dr. Schultz in an attack on Fort Garry. Riel, however, released the prisoners, and at D. A. Smith's request the force dispersed. As the men from Portage is Prairie were passing to the rear of Fort Garry, Riel intercepted them and took the entire party prisoners. Dr. Schultz, with an Indian as his guide and only companion, made his way on snow-shoes to Duluth at the head of Lake Superior, and thence to Canada. Major Boulton, the leader of the Portage la Prairie party, was sentenced by Riel to be shot. Apparently this was only a ruse to secure D. A. Smith's good offices in inducing the English-speaking parishes to elect their members to the new council. which was shortly to meet. Upon a promise being given, Major Boulton's life was spared.

Murder of Thomas Scott.—Riel still persisted in detaining, as rebels against the new " provisional government," the prisoners lately taken. Matters, nevertheless, seemed to be shaping for a peaceful solution of all difficulties, when an unexpected exercise of his power by the half-breed leader created dismay in the settlement, and hot anger in Canada. Among the prisoners was a young


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