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296   HISTORY OF CANADA.

council, which was carried. Then, in order to force the matter to an issue, the assembly declined to proceed with the work of legislation, or to vote any but the most meagre supplies.

Responsible Government Conceded.—Sir Donald Camp-bell, in proroguing the assembly, expressed his disapproval of what he called " the premeditated neglect of their legislative functions." But the assembly soon had reason to congratulate themselves upon the result of their decided stand. When they next met (1851) a despatch was laid before them in which the new lieutenant-governor (Sir A. Bannerman) was instructed to introduce responsible government. The executive council was at once remodelled upon this basis. Control of the internal postal service of the island was at the same time conceded as in the ease of the other provinces, and the island legislature at once passed an Act for the improvement of this important service. The result of the introduction of responsible government was very soon seen in the wiping out of the public debt of Prince Edward Island, which in 1850 had amounted to £28,000.

Political Progress.—Other political events may be briefly mentioned. In 1848 a Simultaneous Polling Act was passed, under which elections to the assembly are all held on one day. In 1852 an Act was passed which very materially extended the elective franchise. At this time there was apparent danger of a dead-lock between the legislative council and the assembly, a majority of the former being opposed to the government (the Roll ministry), which had but a small majority in the assembly. Although an election had just taken place, it had been held upon the old franchise. With a view, therefore, to an expression of opinion by the enlarged electorate, Sir A. Bannerman dissolved the assembly. The result was a decided majority against the government,'and the Hell ministry at once resigned. While substantially in the right, the lieutenant-governor was much blamed for his action. It was generally anticipated that a general election upon the new voters' lists would result adversely to the government, and Sir A. Bannerman's conduct had the appearance of undue favor to the party which had a majority in the legislative council. There was in some respects an apparent failure to properly appreciate the true workings of popular government. Thus, as late as 1857, there was a strong feeling on the island that the salaried heads of departments should not have seats in the assembly, the provin-


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