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272   HISTORY OF CANADA.

Isles during the years from 1840 to 1850 was very large. After tfie potato famine in Ireland in 1847 there was a, large state-aided emigration of destitute Irish. At Quebec nearly one hundred thousand arrivals were entered. Ship-fever broke out in the vessels engaged in the work of transportation, and at one time there were ten thousand sick in the hospitals. For the ten years from 1840 to 1850 the arrivals at Quebec numbered 350,004). The Maritime Provinces received a large increase to their population during the same period. From 1840 to 1850 New Bruns-wick alone received thirty-seven thousand, and Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island were not without their share. These later arrivals were distributed through the settled districts, and did not form distinct settlements as the earlier immigrants had done.

End of the Draper Ministry. —The Draper ministry mean-while had a hard struggle to maintain itself in power. There were frequent changes in its membership. In May, 1846, John A. Macdonald became receiver-general. In the same month Hon. \V. H. Draper retired, and was shortly afterwards made a judge. He died, in 1877, chief-justice of the Court of Error and Appeal for Ontario, after a judicial career of singular ability. Upon his retirement the ministry was known as the Sherwood-Daly minis-try. It managed to survive the session of 1847, but in the elections held in January, 1848, the Reformers—once more reunited—swept the country.

A Crisis in Nova Scotia.—We must now return to Nova Scotia, where the election of 1843 had left it somewhat in doubt which of the warring sections in the ministry had secured a majority of the assembly. About this time the resignation of the Lafontaine-Baldwin ministry in Canada and the cause of it became known in Nova Scotia. Very shortly afterwards Lord Falkland, without any previous intimation to the Reform members of his council, appointed a brother-in-law of Attorney-General Johnston to a seat in it, thus increasing the influence of the old section. Uniacke, Howe and MacNab at once (December, 1843) resigned, taking the ground that as they were not prepared to justify the appointment in the assembly no other course was open to them. Lord Falkland somewhat warmly accused them of endeavoring to wrest from him the prerogatives of the Crown. Being supported in this view by the remaining members of his


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