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HISTORY OF CANADA.   269

man—the Rt. Hon. Sir John Alexander Macdonald. He was elected as a supporter of the governor.

The Governor Wins.—Much difficulty was experienced in forming a new government. Until after prorogation Dominick Daly was the ministry. Then Hon. W. H. Draper was induced to take up the apparently hopeless task of forming such an executive council as should he able, when parliament next met, to secure the confidence of the assembly. To this extent responsible government was never questioned ; the majority for the ex-ministers in the assembly must be changed in some way into a majority for the new cabinet. One notable defection there was from the ranks of the reformers. Denis B. Viger accepted a seat in the new council, and the ministry because known for a time as the Draper-Viger ministry. For over nine months the remaining seats in the council went "a-begging," so hopeless appeared the prospect of securing parliamentary support. In September, 1844, three additienal councillors were sworn in. One of these was D. B. Papineau, a brother of the celebrated Lower Canadian leader. With this ministry of six members, Sir Charles Metcalfe dissolved parliament and appealed to the country. A stormy election followed. When the returns were all in, it appeared that the governor had secured a small majority. Lower Canada had pronounced strongly against him, Upper Canada even more strongly for him. In England the opinion of leading statesmen was with the governor, upon the supposition, apparently, that a pledge had been demanded of him by his ex-ministers. He was made Baron Metcalfe as a mark of approval of the course he had pursued.

A Small Majority.—The political history of Canada during the next three years may be passed quickly over. The ministry was upheld by a very slight majority, and little important legislation was effected. In 1843 it had been decided to make Montreal the capital, and the first session of the new parliament was held there. A resolution in favor of the use of the French language, as well as the English, in the records of parliament was passed by a unanimous vote. As the exclusive use of the English language was imposed by an Imperial Act—the Union Act of 1840—Imperial legislation was necessary to carry out the resolution, and this was not obtained until nearly four years later (1848). Overtures were


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