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268   HISTORY OF CANADA.

one was made in direct opposition to their advice. After remonstrance, the entire cabinet, with the exception of Dominick Daly, resigned.

The Question at Issue. — The principle at stake may be shortly stated. The governor claimed that the power of appointment to all public offices rested solely with himself ; that the patronage of the Crown was entirely in his keeping, and should not be dispensed to further the views of the party in power. The ministers, on the other hand, claimed that the character and standing of those subordinate officials, through whom public affairs must necessarily be carried on, was a matter of public importance ; and that it was their duty, as a cabinet responsible to the people of the province, to see that offices were not conferred upon men whose views were hostile to those of the majority in parliament. As the contest went on, the governor further claimed that he had been required by his late ministers to pledge himself, in advance, to follow their views. This the ministers denied, stating that they had merely claimed the right to resign if their advice as to the distribution of patronage was not followed. That they were right and the governor wrong is now universally admitted. At that time, however, many able men took the view that the distribution of patronage should be kept clear of party politics.

Distinguished Champions.—After the resignation of the Lafontaine-Baldwin ministry the assembly passed resolutions sup-porting the stand they had taken. Shortly afterwards parliament was prorogued. Then followed a most notable contest extending over many months, and bringing into the field some distinguished champions on either side. Dr. Ryerson threw his great influence into the scale on the side of the governor, and, under the mot de phone of " Leonidas," wrote able pamphlets supporting his views. R. B. Sullivan, one of the ex-ministers, upheld their cause in letters signed " Legion." Their most influential advocate, how-ever, was a young Scotsman, George Brown, who, in March, 1844, established the Globe newspaper. By his trenchant articles he soon won for his paper a position as the leading organ upon the reform side. It is also worthy of note that, in the election which came off in the autumn, the successful candidate in Kingston was a man who afterwards became a prominent Canadian states-


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