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256   HISTORY OF CANADA.

agitation largely subsided. Much interest was naturally taken in Canadian affairs ; the progress of events along the Canadian frontier was eagerly watched ; and New Brunswick offered to send twelve hundred volunteers to aid in repelling the incursions of American "sympathizers."

The Maine Boundary Trouble.—Early in 1839 it looked as if there would be work for these volunteers upon their own frontier. The King of the Netherlands had in 1831 made his award concerning the unsettled boundary line between Maine and New Brunswick. It was a compromise pure and simple, and there-fore satisfactory to neither party. Instead of deciding what were the "highlands" mentioned in the Treaty of Versailles (1783), it arbitrarily placed the boundary line in the bed of the River St. John. The United States flatly declined to recognize it, and the whole question was thus again at large. Rival lumbermen of the Aroostook and the Madawaska again quarrelled over their limits, and the governor of Maine again threatened to take possession of the disputed territory. Sir John Harvey at once took steps to maintain the integrity of what was then claimed as British soil, and, with a small force, marched to the scene of the threatened invasion. The loyalty of the province was enthusiastic. Money was liberally voted and the militia were ordered out both in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. A troop of volunteer dragoons under Colonel L. A. Wilmot—the leader of the reformers in New Brunswick—performed despatch duty on the border, securing communication with the provincial capital and blocking every forest path by which the enemy might advance. Happily the opposing commanders, Sir John Harvey and General Winfield Scott, were sensible men. They soon arranged that the region should be evacuated pending further negotiations between the two powers.

Reformers in the Executive Council. —The personal influence of Lieutenant-Governor Harvey was sufficient to prevent marked friction in the carrying on of the government of New Brunswick. Upon his departure for Newfoundland in 1841, Sir William Colebrooke became lieutenant-governor. As he showed a disposition to favor the Family Compact, Wilmot and the other reform leaders determined to contest the election of 1842 on the question of responsible government. They were utterly routed at the polls, electing only two of their candidates (Wilmot himself


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