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254   HISTORY OF CANADA.

he bore strong testimony, while he assailed what he termed the "overweening pretensions" of the English-speaking minority. For his services in forwarding the union the governor was made a peer, with the title of Lord Sydenham. On the 5th of February, 1841, he issued a proclamation, as required by the Union Act, naming the 10th of February, 1841, as the elate when the union should take effect.

Under the Union Act, the province of Canada—for by this name the united provinces were to be known—was provided with a legislative council and an assembly. The legislative council was to consist of not less than twenty members, appointed by the Crown for life ; the assembly of eighty-four members, one-half from each of the two old divisions, Upper and Lower Canada. The number of representatives in the assembly could be altered only by a two-thirds majority in both branches of the legislature. The capital of Canada was to be fixed from time to time by the governor. The assembly was to continue for four years after each election, unless sooner dissolved by the governor. Any provincial Act, even when assented to by the governor, might be disallowed iu England at any time within two years after its receipt by the colonial secretary. All written proceedings and records of the legislature were to be in the English language only.

All taxes levied in the province under Imperial Acts were to be appropriated by the provincial legislature, subject, however, to payment of a Civil List of £75,000 per annum as fixed by the Union Act. The casual and territorial revenues of the Crown were at the same time surrendered to provincial control, with a provision, however, that any Act dealing with Crown lands should receive approval in England before coining into force. All revenues collected in the province were to form a consolidated fund out of which were to be paid (1) the expenses of collection, (2) the interest on the public debts of the provinces, (3) the moneys payable to the clergy of different denominations under the Act, passed at the same session, to settle the Clergy Reserves question, and (4) the Civil List ; and the balance was to be appropriated as the provincial parliament should determine. The wise provision was made, however, that no moneys were to be voted except upon message from the Crown—that is to say, upon the responsibility of the executive council. Lord Durham had pointed


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