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HISTORY OF CANADA.   247

ment upon Lord Durham's transportation Act. The law officers of the Crown having questioned its legal validity, the British ministry announced that it would be disallowed. Lord Durham, in high dudgeon, resigned his position and set sail for England (November, 18.38), first, however, issuing a proclamation in which he blamed the Imperial authorities for not supporting him. This manifesto gained for him among his political opponents the name of the Lord High Seditioner.

The Famous Report.—On his way home, Lord Durham, with the assistance of his secretary, Charles Buller, prepared his celebrated report—the keynote of colonial emancipation. To the French-Canadians his recommendation in favor of the union of Upper and Lower Canada was extremely obnoxious ; but even they admit the wisdom of his views upon the general question of colonial government. His statement of the various grievances under which the colonies labored is very long; his suggested remedy may be shortly stated, and, as Howe said, it is "perfectly simple and eminently British." Lord Durham said in effect: " Place the internal government of the colonies in the hands of the colonists themselves. They now make their own laws ; let them execute them as well. If they make mistakes they will find them out, and they will remedy them more quickly and thoroughly than can we in Great Britain. It needs no Act of parliament to effect this change. .Simply tell each governor that he must govern by means of an executive council having the confidence of the people of the colony. Tell him, too, that he need count on no aid from home in any difference with the assembly which does not directly touch the interests of the Empire as a whole. In short, assure each colony that its government shall henceforth be carried on in conformity with the views of the majority in the assembly. All the grievances, of which we have heard so much, have arisen from the faulty system of government. Reform the system as I suggest, and these grievances will soon disappear."

Lord Russell's Despatches.—This report was laid before the British parliament early in 1839. Lord John Russell introduced a bill for the union of the two Canadas, which, after discussion, was allowed to lie over until the next session in order that the consent of the two provinces might be secured. For this purpose


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