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238   HISTORY OF CANADA.

Dissatisfaction in Both Provinces.—In both the Canadas these resolutions were regarded as a death-blow to the hopes of reformers. In Upper Canada the assembly was with the Family Compact, and now the Reform ministry of England had declined to afford any assistance. In Lower Canada, the Civil List was to be settled by an Imperial Act and the assembly treated as an erring child. Through the summer of 1837 public meetings were held in both the provinces, at which the exasperated feelings of the popular party found expression in strong resolutions. The newspapers were equally forcible in giving vent to their views. But when Mackenzie and Papineau, with a few of the more ardent of their friends, began to threaten a resort to arms to obtain redress, it soon became apparent that such a step would find but little support.

Lower Canada—Revolt Threatened.—In Lower Canada the assembly met in August, 1837, and promptly declined to deal, under compulsion, with the question of supplies. It was forthwith prorogued. The agitation went on with increased warmth, but, outside of a small district in the immediate neighborhood of Montreal, there was no thought of an armed rising. The French-Canadians were prepared to elect extremists to the assembly, but rebellion was no part of their plan. When threats of revolt were made, Le Canadiea, the most influential of the newspapers upon the popular side, emphatically protested. The Roman Catholic bishop issued a tnandetnent setting forth the duty of obedience to the authorities. Papineau himself for a time advocated nothing more pronounced than a refusal to purchase British goods. He seems fina]ly to have been induced to take stronger ground by Dr. Wolfred Nelson, who spoke of a trade war as a "peddling policy."

Colborne's Vigorous Measures.—Sir .Tohn Colborne, commander-in-chief of the British forces in America, made every preparation to put down any outbreak. He organized volunteer corps in Montreal and Quebec, and ordered up regulars from New Brunswick. The militia, under such officers as Hertel de Rouville and others of the French-Canadian seigneurs, were drilled and held in readiness. Early in November there was a street riot in Montreal between members of the Doric Club and the Sons of Liberty, and shortly afterwards warrants were issued for the arrest of a number of the extremists upon a charge of


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