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HISTORY OF CANADA.   229

putting an end to the dispute about quit-rents and to controlling the coal mines of the province, the assembly passed resolutions asking that entire control of the provincial revenues should be given up to them. At this time, it must be remembered, the Imperial government was in favor of surrendering the control of colonial revenues to the colonial assemblies if the latter would pass Acts to secure official salaries on a scale acceptable to the colonial office. In Upper Canada the offer had been promptly accepted by an assembly favorable to tho official party and with little trouble on the question of scale. In Lower Canada, what moderate reformers had thought a fair offer was rejected by the extremists. New Brunswick, as we have seen, settled her civil list in 1837, after a short contest. In Nova Scotia the struggle was long and bitter. The officials of the province had sufficient influence with the colonial office to have the civil list arranged upon so high a scale that the assembly for many years declined to pass it.

Joseph Howe Attacks the Council.--In 1834 Sir Colin Campbell became lieutenant-governor of Nova Scotia. In the following year the prosecution of Joseph Howe brought him so prominently before the public as an ardent advocate of reform, that at the general election of 1836 he was returned as one of the members for Halifax County. In the assembly he became in a very short time the leader of the popular party. At this time the council, even while acting in its legislative capacity, sat with closed doors. The assembly had from time to time passed resolutions against this secrecy, and in favor also of dividing the council into executive and legislative branches. A resolution of this character was passed early in the session of 1837 and communicated to the council. Their reply was so unyielding that Howe determined at once to attack them. To this end he pro-posed twelve resolutions in which the composition of the council was graphically described and condemned. The council thereupon threatened to stop public business if the resolutions were not rescinded, and, as the appropriation bill was not yet passed, the position was serious. Rather than cause this public inconvenience, Howe moved that the obnoxious resolutions be rescinded, and they were rescinded accordingly.

Reform in the Council Demanded.—Later in the session,


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