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HISTORY OF CANADA.   227

the agitation at length subsided. During Kempt's time the population of Nova Scotia increased so rapidly that Boards of Location were established to facilitate settlement, and there was a marked effort to improve the road communication throughout the province. Kempf., whose administration is described as "most efficient," was in 1828 promoted in his turn to the governorship, and of his rule in Lower Canada mention has already been made. He was succeeded in Nova Scotia by Sir Peregrine Maitland from Upper Canada.

The Question of Quit-rents.—For many years the subject of quit-rents caused much agitation in the province. There had been no regular attempt by the Crown officers to collect them, and they had ceased to be considered a charge upon the lands. In 1811 Receiver-General Uniacke took steps to enforce payment of arrears, which in many cases amounted to as much as the land was worth. The assembly at once vigorously pro-tested. In reply it was informed that the claim to quit-rents would be abandoned if a suitable endowment were voted to the Anglican Church. This the assembly declined to do. During the war of 1812 and for some years afterwards no active step was taken to enforce collection, though the claim was not relinquished. In 1827, however, it was announced that all arrears were abandoned, but that, for the future, payment would be enforced and the rents applied to local improvement. The assembly insisted that the claim should be abandoned in its entirety. After several years of warm dispute the Crown in 1834 agreed to accept £2,000 per annum (to be applied on the lieutenant-governor's salary) as the price to be paid for the relinquishment of the claim. It was during the disputes over this question that the opposition to the Family Compact became well organized.

The Barry Case.—In 1829 a somewhat exciting contest took place between the assembly and Barry, one of its members, on a question of privilege. Barry in debate used strong language toward a brother member, and was called upon by the House to apologize. Declining to do so, he was suspended, and afterwards was committed to gaol for attacking in the newspapers the action of the assembly. There was much popular feeling over th ' matter, particularly among Barry's constituents. Howe in his nen Taper, the Nova Scotian, warmly defended the action of the assembly (of


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